Historic mansions ooze grandeur from days gone by, and are loved by both Britons and tourists alike. However, the UK has been guilty of abandoning many of these stately homes over the years, so much so that significant repairs would be needed to bring some back to life.

Despite this, doing so could be worth it, as not only do they represent part of British history, they also have a lot of economic value.

Yorkshire Post reported that the transformation of Rise Hall in the East Riding of Yorkshire has had huge significance to the area.

The mansion first hit the headlines when TV property expert Sarah Beeny bought the dilapidated 11th Century mansion with her husband Graham Swift in 2001 for £440,000.

In the Channel 4 documentary Restoration Nightmare, Beeny revealed the epic update the couple gave to the 29-bedroom Grade-II listed building.

They did so much work, in fact, that the 47-year-old managed to sell the 97-room stately home for £1.4 million last year. What’s more, it is now a hugely popular venue for weddings and events, with people all over the country choosing the historic manor for their special day.

Since selling it, the new owners, Dan and Helen Gill, have invested a further £200,000 into the building for it to become a fully commercially-viable enterprise, while maintaining its historic character.

Writing in the newspaper, Mr Gill said: “Stately homes, halls and mansions alike can be as functional and commercial as buildings that are newly erected in our city centres.”

He added: “I’d argue that restoration and renovation provide the more cost and time-effective option to drive regeneration.”

However, Mr Gill noted that Historic England’s Heritage At Risk report found as many as 555 historic sites across Yorkshire are “still at risk of being demolished and falling into disrepair”.

This seems to be the case throughout the UK, and Woolton Hall in Liverpool is another building that could be great and well-loved if it was given some attention.

Liverpool Echo reported how the 300-year-old building has been abandoned and is now at risk of becoming dilapidated.

The 1704 construction was originally built for the Molyneux family and has been a hotel, school, convent and family house throughout its time. In the 1980s it was close to being demolished before being saved by John Hibbert and becoming a Grade-I listed building.

However, it has since been vandalised over the years and in May it was subject to, what was thought to be, deliberate arson attack.

Despite this, some residents want to see buildings like Woolton Hall rescued. Terry O’Callaghan, 54, told the publication: “Once these buildings are gone, they’re gone. These buildings are chunks of history.”

The photographer, who takes pictures of the historic site, said: “I’d like to think that in 20 years’ time, my photos will still be out there.”

However, it remains unknown whether Woolton Hall itself will be.

To rescue buildings before they disappear forever, invest in dilapidation treatment today.

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